Millefeuille

~A Thousand Pages~

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Tessa Afshar is one of my favorite authors! I’ve read Pearl in the Sand, Harvest of Rubies, and Harvest of Gold and absolutely loved them all. Needless to say, I was eagerly awaiting In the Field of Grace,  and I was not disappointed!

I’ve read lots of Biblical novels - many of them about women - but I can’t remember reading a full-length novel about Ruth. Afshar begins the novel with Ruth living in Moab, meeting her future mother-in-law Naomi, marrying Mahlon, and subsequently becoming a widow. I thought that the story would have started further along but I was pleasantly surprised that the author included this “back story” before Ruth and Naomi travel back to Judah.

The author also includes her interpretation of Boaz’s back story, which is obviously made up since it’s not included in the Bible. But she didn’t really diverge / contradict what we know from the Bible so I didn’t have a problem with Boaz’s story since it is a novel. (I didn’t agree with Afshar’s state of the dead sections but those were thankfully limited).
I liked how the author dealt with Ruth’s transition to life in Judah; being treated differently because she was a foreigner and a Moabitess to boot; and how the trials she faced polished her character and increased her faith.
This book was thoroughly researched historically (i.e. the concept of a goel kinsman redeemer) and includes plenty of romance! It was very well-written, and I would recommend it to anyone who likes Biblical novels.

Tessa Afshar is one of my favorite authors! I’ve read Pearl in the Sand, Harvest of Rubies, and Harvest of Gold and absolutely loved them all. Needless to say, I was eagerly awaiting In the Field of Grace,  and I was not disappointed!

I’ve read lots of Biblical novels - many of them about women - but I can’t remember reading a full-length novel about Ruth. Afshar begins the novel with Ruth living in Moab, meeting her future mother-in-law Naomi, marrying Mahlon, and subsequently becoming a widow. I thought that the story would have started further along but I was pleasantly surprised that the author included this “back story” before Ruth and Naomi travel back to Judah.

The author also includes her interpretation of Boaz’s back story, which is obviously made up since it’s not included in the Bible. But she didn’t really diverge / contradict what we know from the Bible so I didn’t have a problem with Boaz’s story since it is a novel. (I didn’t agree with Afshar’s state of the dead sections but those were thankfully limited).

I liked how the author dealt with Ruth’s transition to life in Judah; being treated differently because she was a foreigner and a Moabitess to boot; and how the trials she faced polished her character and increased her faith.

This book was thoroughly researched historically (i.e. the concept of a goel kinsman redeemer) and includes plenty of romance! It was very well-written, and I would recommend it to anyone who likes Biblical novels.

Filed under book review book review recommend recommendation In the Field of Grace Bible Biblical Biblical novel novel historical fiction Tessa Afshar Afshar Ruth Book of Ruth Old Testament OT

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Saving Amelie by Cathy Gohlke was a superb book. One of my favorite genres of books is World War II resistance novels, and I haven’t read a good one in awhile, so I thoroughly enjoyed this book.

Out of all the WWII resistance novels I’ve read, none have focused on the appalling eugenics theories / practices of the Nazi regime. During a trip to Germany, the main character in the book, Rachel, discovers that her American scientist father is heavily involved in the eugenics movement, and that she was separated from her identical twin at birth (in Germany) as part of a twisted experiment. Simultaneously, she also becomes involved with helping to save little Amelie, the deaf daughter of an American friend and an evil Nazi officer. Amelie’s father is determined to get rid of her, as having a deaf daughter is an embarrassment to his position in the Reich. A handsome American reporter begins helping Rachel and Amelie, and searches for a way for them to escape Germany.

I don’t want to give away too much of the story, but there are also several sections of the novel that focus on the teachings of Dietrich Bonhoeffer, so that was very interesting.

I really enjoyed this book and wish there were more like it! It was a mix of history, romance, intrigue, and excitement. If you like historical romance novels or WWII novels, I would absolutely recommend this book!


I received a complimentary copy of this book from Tyndale House Publishers for this review. The opinions expressed are my own.

Saving Amelie by Cathy Gohlke was a superb book. One of my favorite genres of books is World War II resistance novels, and I haven’t read a good one in awhile, so I thoroughly enjoyed this book.

Out of all the WWII resistance novels I’ve read, none have focused on the appalling eugenics theories / practices of the Nazi regime. During a trip to Germany, the main character in the book, Rachel, discovers that her American scientist father is heavily involved in the eugenics movement, and that she was separated from her identical twin at birth (in Germany) as part of a twisted experiment. Simultaneously, she also becomes involved with helping to save little Amelie, the deaf daughter of an American friend and an evil Nazi officer. Amelie’s father is determined to get rid of her, as having a deaf daughter is an embarrassment to his position in the Reich. A handsome American reporter begins helping Rachel and Amelie, and searches for a way for them to escape Germany.

I don’t want to give away too much of the story, but there are also several sections of the novel that focus on the teachings of Dietrich Bonhoeffer, so that was very interesting.

I really enjoyed this book and wish there were more like it! It was a mix of history, romance, intrigue, and excitement. If you like historical romance novels or WWII novels, I would absolutely recommend this book!

I received a complimentary copy of this book from Tyndale House Publishers for this review. The opinions expressed are my own.

Filed under book review book review WWII World War II novels historical novels fiction Christian fiction Dietrich Bonhoeffer Bonhoeffer resistance Holocaust

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I learned recently how addicting Pinterest can be! They used to only allow you to have three secret boards. Since I didn’t want all my pins to be public, I just ended up not using Pinterest at all. I discovered the other day that Pinterest now allows an unlimited number of secret pins. So I created a bunch of secret boards, and pinned several hundred posts over the course of a week!! It’s super fun but as I said - addicting!! lol :)

I learned recently how addicting Pinterest can be! They used to only allow you to have three secret boards. Since I didn’t want all my pins to be public, I just ended up not using Pinterest at all. I discovered the other day that Pinterest now allows an unlimited number of secret pins. So I created a bunch of secret boards, and pinned several hundred posts over the course of a week!! It’s super fun but as I said - addicting!! lol :)

Filed under Pinterest pins social media secret boards